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Autumn Curriculum Overview- Nursery

Subject Details


Personal, Social and Emotional DevelopmentSelf-Regulation

•Understand the routines and expectations of Nursery
•Develop the social skills needed to function in a group setting
•Understand the need to adhere to agreed values and codes of behaviour to work harmoniously together
•Learn and practice the techniques of mindfulness to support the regulation of emotion and build emotional resilience
•More readily choose their responses to situations
•Understand their uniqueness and find what is special about themselves
•Be proud of something they are good at
•Experience quietness, stillness and being calm
•Learn to sit next to others, possibly in a circle

Managing Self

•Learn what being responsible means
•Understand when they have been unkind
•Know when and why they, and others, are angry
•Wait their turn to speak and have a go
•Opportunities to develop and practise social skills, sharing and taking turns, listening to each other, understanding some of the ways in which someone can be a friend – with adult support
•Use their own words to express themselves and their ideas
•Listen to and learn stories focusing on behaviour, relationships with others, following rules and routines

Building Relationships

•Understand how it feels, and how important it is, to belong to a group
•Explore the core feelings of happiness, excitement, sadness and fearfulness and learn ways to identify and label these feelings
•Understand how feelings can be expressed
•Appreciate and celebrate differences
•Know that families and individuals are different
•Know how to be kind to others
•Consider how everybody can be helped to feel safe and happy in the setting
•Know how to be friendly and why it is important
•Play alongside and with other children and adults
•Know that all people can feel the same emotions, but not always in the same situations
•Develop empathy and work out what others are feeling
•Know how our actions can affect people’s feelings


Physical DevelopmentGross Motor Skills

•Begin to demonstrate and talk about their work
•Experience a variety of rolls, tuck, log, down a hill, across a mat
•Experience jumping and landing safely (2 feet to 2 feet, 1 to 1)
•Experience hopping with support if necessary
•Experience balancing in a fixed position to hold a shape and balancing to walk along a line
•Join /repeat simple movements at more than one speed - include appropriate vocabulary
•Talk about travel and stillness - hop, freeze, statue, jump
•Use appropriate vocabulary and different ways of moving
•Begin to develop their ability to follow instructions and stop on command •Begin to show an awareness of space within the setting and how it is used by others by: -creating pathways -exploring own spaces and enclosures -judging body space
•Practise moving in different ways and at different speeds, balancing, target throwing, rolling, kicking and catching
•Find out and encourage children’s favourite music play- encourage children to move to the beat and dance freely
•Introduce moving in time to music
•Model larger body movement-side steps, hip movements and arm lifts
•Begin to introduce early dance through simple large scale sequences-nursery rhyme actions ( twinkle, twinkle- hands high and low/ tip toes)
•Explore animal movements- hedgehogs curling in a ball, the bear walk etc.
•Practise movement skills through games with beanbags, cones, balls and hoops
•Mark out boundaries for some activities such as games involving wheeled toys or balls, so that children can more easily regulate their own activities
•Encourage children to move with controlled effort, and use associated vocabulary such as strong, firm, gentle, heavy, stretch, reach, tense and floppy
•Introduce the vocabulary required to support children with talking about the movements they make

Fine Motor Skills

•Children can dress and control fastenings independently – zip, beginning to do up or undo buttons, •Incorporate small action songs and finger rhymes •Finger gym stations- include a range of pine cones leaves, acorns, different sized pots and tweezers
•In role play provide dolls and dressing up that allows children to explore fastenings, buttons, toggles and zips
•Introduce the creative area and the basic tools; use of glue stick, scissors, mark making equipment, construction equipment, mouse, kneading and rolling dough, moulding and pattern making in wet sand etc.
•Model using equipment and tools safely
•Begin to operate equipment by means of pushing and pulling movements
•Begin to explore a range of equipment to support their learning in relation to developing control, e.g. construction equipment
•Begin to hold a range of tools correctly/comfortably, rolling pin, hammer, brush, glue stick, large paint brush/roller, saw, gardening tools, cooking utensils, musical instruments, etc
•Continue to develop hand-eye co-ordination through a range of activities – musical instruments, small world, construction equipment, art activities, manipulating natural and man-made resources, using a variety of one handed tools and equipment
•To model use of specific skills when using tools and materials across all areas of learning, e.g. use of glue stick, scissors, mark making equipment, construction equipment, mouse, kneading and rolling dough, moulding and pattern making in wet sand etc.
Communication and Language Listening & Attention & Understanding

•Practitioners modelling listening, attention, understanding and speaking (expressive and receptive language)
•Follow the child’s lead to talk about what they are interested in
•For children learning English as an additional language, value non-verbal communications and those offered in home languages
•Add words to what children say, e.g. child says ‘Brush dolly hair’, you say ‘Yes, Lucy is brushing dolly’s hair.’
•Talk with children to make links between their body language and words, e.g. “Your face does look cross. Has something upset you?”
•Introduce new words in the context of play and activities
•Display pictures and photographs showing familiar events, objects and activities and talk about them with the children
•Set up a listening area where children can explore and enjoy music, from a range of genres, sounds, rhymes and stories
•Explore ways of encouraging active listening;
•Moving with music or painting/drawing with music may support children to listen
•Encourage repetition, rhythm and rhyme
•Use puppets and other props to encourage listening and responding when singing a familiar song or reading from a story book
•Encourage turn taking during circle time by passing round a microphone or teddy/ Pass a phrase around a circle i.e. "I'm wearing shoes"
•Encourage children to listen to and respond to the needs of others •Give children opportunities to listen to practitioners, peers and a range of other speakers in relation to activities, opportunities and events
•Ensure children hear a range of vocabulary in relation to learning theme and experiences Give opportunities to listen to and follow 1/2 part instructions
•Develop children’s ability to listen and respond appropriately during sound games: musical statues, sound and response games, sound effects
•Encourage children to use verbal and physical language to describe sounds and music

Speaking

•Provide activities, such as cooking, where talk is used to anticipate or initiate what children will be doing, e.g. “We need some eggs. Let’s see if we can find some in here.”
•Ask parents to share their favourite songs and stories
•Use words and/or gestures to communicate
•Be aware of the needs to attend to one thing at a time
•Begin to think and talk about thoughts, feelings and ideas, using all senses, to communicate needs in relation to: personal needs/requirements social talk daily routine experiences : recount/ describe/ predict/ explain/ discuss/ talk about play/reason activities book talk writer talk story-telling and story-making: imitate, innovate, invent word and language games role-play and drama circle time discussions reflection and enquiry, review (SEAL)
•Create opportunities for children and adults to use vocabulary for different purposes and audiences, in relation to activities and experiences i.e. make a role play area into the farm, shop, kitchen, new class in the setting, restaurant, etc
•Model: asking questions responding to questions discussing personal events and experiences describing discuss their feelings
•Tell stories supported by props
•Tell a variety of stories, songs, chants, nursery rhymes, poems and non-fiction, encouraging children to respond verbally and non-verbally
•Provide opportunities for vocabulary extension/use. Collect vocabulary for word banks, use a rich vocabulary to reinforce ideas i.e. use objects to talk about such as a dirty old boot, encourage children to describe it, ask you questions about it, think about whose it is? Why it was in the playground? Make a story around it etc.


Literacy Reading Process

•Recognise reading is a form of communication which conveys meaning
-Explore a range of stories, rhymes, songs and poems through:
•Listening
-to adults, children, talking stories etc
•Joining in
-sound effects, missing words, etc telling / retelling
•Reading known text and using illustrations as prompts
•Using props, finger puppets, story boards, role play, masks, etc. encouraging both verbal and non-verbal response
•Recall information (character, setting, plot, key facts, answer questions, discuss pictures and photographs etc)
-develop prerequisite skills such as figure-ground differentiation, auditory and visual identification, memory, recall and sequencing, and the characteristics of effective learning
-explore a range of non-fiction texts (pictures, videos, photographs, ICT, graphics, etc.) in relation to the learning theme and learning zones (construction, imaginative play, discovery zone etc) -develop reading like behaviour through practitioner modelling e.g. :hold book correct way up
-turn page
-use pictorial and visual clues in order to retell familiar rhymes, stories etc
-beginning to show an awareness of direction (left-right, top-bottom)
•Begin to identify with personal symbols, logos, sounds, pictures and print in relation to themselves in the new environment ~ recognise their name in print

Writing Process

•Recognise mark making as a form of communication, which is related to print and conveys meaning
•Mark-make in a variety of learning activities and experiences linked to all curriculum areas
•Talk, mark and draw pictures, in a variety of learning activities
•Personalise their own work ~ begin to explore and experiment with a range of mark-making tools (including ICT)
•Manipulate a range of objects and tools in relation to the learning theme, experiences, setting
•Use one-handed tools and equipment and develop hand strength, gross to fine motor strength and co-ordination
•Begin to show an awareness of the conventions of writing (left to right, top to bottom) and different writing patterns (observational art and photos/ art works/ write )
•Begin to use mark making with growing confidence for a variety of purposes: posters, cards, lists, labels, calendar, simple picture stories, poems, leaving a message……
•Develop an awareness that the written community language may differ from the written language of other adults and peers in the setting


Mathematics Number

•Begin to listen to, join in and respond to number rhymes, songs, stories and games, saying and using number names
•Model reciting to 3, then 6+ encouraging the children to join in.
•Demonstrate growing confidence spotting errors when counting
•Say some number names in sequence
•Use some number names and number language accurately
•Recognise and continue repeating patterns
•Model counting everyday objects (houses, cars, dolls) using number, names and number language, demonstrating some understanding of 1 to 1 correspondence (to 3) and the idea that anything can be counted (abstraction principle)
•Show awareness of 1-1 correspondence through practical everyday experiences
•Recognize that anything can be counted – jumps, clock chimes, bubbles, computer images, skittles etc…
•Show awareness of numbers in their environment. - Offer comments or ask questions about numbers demonstration their curiosity
•Begin to recognise some number symbols of personal importance (e.g. 3, I am 3 years old) - Begin to recognise some numbers in print and within new environment. - Model recording including writing numbers in a range of situations - Model counting to 3/6 putting numbers in the right order (e.g. using number line) - Model estimating everyday objects in a range of situations - Explore using money in role play

Shape, Space and Measure

•Show an interest in shape by playing with and exploring a range of shapes and objects
•Explore a range of objects
-natural, man-made, loose parts play to describe, collect, and examine from different perspective
•Model and share vocabulary to describe shape and space (such as flat, curved, hollow, edge, pyramid, star etc.) using songs, rhymes, stories and objects of reference
•Begin to explore pattern in a range of activities, in order to develop spatial awareness (seeking patterns)
•Use a range of natural and man-made objects and collections to create patterns [transient art visuals for inspiration in zones]
•Explore objects of different size, introduce the language of size/ measure (tall/ short, long/short, narrow, length) and weight/capacity (heavy, balance, full, holds) in a range of activities
•Begin to be aware of the sequence of the days of the week modelling language such as yesterday, last, today
•Begin to introduce children to own personal clock through routines and model language such as later, early, time
•Count down / up to important events (Christmas)
•Use timers during playful activities to begin to understand the units of time –
-1 minute egg timer
•Use non-standard measure to mark time. Song to wash hands, tidy up music that lasts 3 minutes
•Explore weights of different size, introduce the language of weight/capacity in a range of activities…ensure children can feel the weight different –seesaw/ in bags/pulleys etc.

Calculating

•Model/use language of “more” in role play
•Make comparison between 2 sets of objects, identifying similarities in terms of number
•Separate objects into unequal as well as equal groups
•Begin to make comparisons between quantities
•Use some number language such as ‘more’ and ‘a lot’ - Distinguish between quantities recognizing when a group of objects is more than one
Understanding the WorldPast and Present

•Careful model language of past and present in relation to children’s personal timeline
•Introduce opportunities to share and explore stories, talk about and role play stories about personal elements or events in children’s lives
•Begin to sequence in relation to children’s interest and their discussions, nursery routines, stories, growth, personal routines etc.
•Use pictures, children’s special objects and stories to stimulate opportunities for children to share experiences, modelling discussions
•Introduce and share visual timetable
•Provide opportunities for children to share special events in their lives such as parties, birthdays etc.
•Introduce children to their own personal timeline through daily nursery routines NB. Ensure that changes to routine are shared and you count down to events
•Begin to sequence events in their own lives in relation to the passage of time (photographs, visits, artefacts, clothes, pictures, stories), linked to learning opportunities, events and experience
•Introduce children to change and the passage of time through the seasons e.g. books about the seasons, in order to explore aspects and changes from autumn to winter

People Culture and Communities

•Provide opportunities for parents to share relevant knowledge of the children’s personal experiences and culture capital, e.g. all about me, my family activities
•Begin to be aware that each of us is special and unique (name, birthday, features, characteristics, family, home)
•Draw on information from home with opportunities to share birthdays, home life experiences, sharing feelings, culture and beliefs
•Begin to explore feelings in relation to significant/special events specific to individuals/settings/ community e.g. birthday, death of a pet, new baby in the family, harvest, thanksgiving, Remembrance Sunday, light festivals/celebrations (bonfire night, Diwali, Advent, Christmas, pantomime, Holi), in relation to children in the setting
•Explore and read stories about relevant celebrations and special events during autumn-winter e.g. Christmas, Hanukkah, Diwali
•Know practitioners and discuss their role within the setting from children’s own experiences
•Make use of home role play, provide mirrors, baby dolls, incorporate children’s own family book, exploring their own and hearing others family units
•Tell stories about interesting people in the community

The Natural World

•Use areas of the provision to explore objects through the senses, developing awareness of senses- sensory areas indoors and out
•Observe, model and develop questions about how humans move, feed, grow and use their senses, and talk about what they see, hear etc.
•Use daily routines and practices to support children to make observations and discuss daily change
•Develop an understanding of growth through beginning to understand change over time, from birth in relation to themselves
•Begin to talk about the weather- developing language to describe what is seen/heard/felt
•Raise an awareness of the seasons (autumn/winter)
•Observe changes in weather and nature during this time
•Begin to sort objects, clothes for different types of weather, indoor and outdoor equipment etc.
•Raise an awareness of light and dark comparing and contrasting similarities and differences through the use of stories, photographs, films, sorting nocturnal and diurnal animals and activities.
•Explore sounds and images in relation to day and night, light and dark (stories, puppets, musical theatre)
•Begin to be aware of the sequence of the days of the week and what happens in school/ at home on different days
•Talk about, look at books and use vocabulary linked to body parts and animal bodies
•Observe and draw pictures of animals e.g. pets
•Observe and draw plants in the learning environment

Environments

•Show an interest and curiosity in features of new nursery environment through facial expression, movement or sound, valuing verbal and non-verbal response
•Provide opportunities to support transition and understand expectations- across the classroom environment- inside and outdoor such as how we care for each other and the environment, e.g. tidying, run out not in
•Identify key features of indoor and outdoor environment, through observations, symbols, photographs, talk, simple maps
•Make comparisons between home and nursery and other settings e.g. playgroup, parent & toddler groups, park
•Find out about features/landmarks of relevant environments, natural and built, e.g. through stories, discussions about home and school, sequences of journeys, opportunities for children to share their own journeys, visits, exploring simple maps e.g. map of school on website
•Model and use simple journey maps through experiences, activities, stories, rhymes e.g. journey to school
•Provide a combination of natural, reclaimed, home-made and commercial small world equipment for children to create their own environments


Expressive Arts and DesignCreating with Materials

•Encourage and support the inventive ways in which children add or mix media by offering a range of resources including reclaimed materials, man-made and natural, as well as allowing time for children to explore through flexible routines
•Enable children to explore media and materials on a large scale using a range of colours, shapes, smells, textures, to engage the senses
•Support children’s growing interest in and use of colour, as they begin to find differences in colour, by providing meaningful contexts for children’s explorations
•Model a range of tools across the provision, both indoors and out, and how to use safely and purposefully
•Model techniques, using a range of media and materials, e.g. tearing, cutting, rolling, sticking, moulding, printing
•Provide opportunities to work in both 2D and 3D, using a range of resources
•Model purposeful mark-making opportunities across the provision
•Use body parts and a variety of objects to print pattern and sequence
Being Imaginative and Expressive
•Talk to parents/carers to seek information about songs that are significant to children, songs that they associate with certain environments, e.g. songs they sing/hear in settings, at home or with family
•Songs and rhymes to reinforce vocabulary, supported by props and movement, made accessible for children to access independently
•Use knowledge of children to provide familiar music and support them with new material
•Songs to support nursery routines and alongside children’s play
•Provide resources in the environment that encourage singing and vocal play; cardboard tubing, microphones.
•Create environments that invite children to make music together, e.g. a music table with space around enables children to communicate musically and make music together
•Vary your musical environments, one day drums out on a table and another day baskets with different types of bells. Hang instruments, e.g. musical washing lines.
•Model your respect and care for instruments
•Create opportunities to explore various instruments, homemade sound-makers and real objects, promoting a range of techniques, banging, shaking, tapping, scraping, blowing
•Place a range of instruments in different formations, sizes, e.g. drums in a line, in a circle
•Develop physical control of instruments, tapping a drum with hands or tapping rhythm sticks together require different physical skills
•Introduce children to musical language; pulse, beat, rhythm, pitch, dynamics, timbre, texture, tempo, melodic
•Play sound-matching games, play instruments that children can’t see and invite children to play a matching instrument or describe the instrument
•Play instrument and movement games; invite children to move to the sounds of different instruments
•Explore ways of encouraging active listening; moving, painting, drawing with music may support children to listen; listening in groups and individually
•Explore enclosures for music making, e.g. some children may enjoy making music in dens/enclosed spaces
•Include activities where children need to understand and follow instructions e.g. when moving in specific ways
•Allow children’s individuality when moving or expressing their own response to rhymes, pictures, music, sound, story etc.
•Using stories, music, puppets etc. model body language, gestures, facial expression or words to indicate personal satisfaction or frustration
•Talk to parents/carers to seek information about stories that are significant to children
•Encourage children to listen to and respond to stories they hear and know
•Role play different characters related to the learning opportunities, stories, activity, experiences, using appropriate language e.g. dentist, mother, shopkeeper etc.
•Listen to a range of stories and begin to re-tell them through play and talking to others